Lesson 011. Bargaining in Mandarin Chinese.

In this lesson you will learn how to buy things and how to bargain in Mandarin Chinese, also you will learn more numbers and Chinese monetary units. At the end of the lesson there are answers to the worksheet of Lesson 10. Please sign up and become a registered subscriber to download ALL 252+ audio lessons with full PDF transcripts and worksheets.

14 comments

  1. Serge Melnyk says:

    Yes, Pauline, Chinese-only dialogues are now available, please login to access them.

    And yes, they can be used with any noun. When talking about plurals, it doesn’t really matter which measure word, because we talk about several objects together, not single objects. Only if we name a single object, we need to use a measure word for that particular thing.

    E.g. Zhe4 jian4 shi4qing2-this matter, but zhe4xie1 shi4qing2-these matters.

    Thanks.

  2. Pauline Armitage says:

    Hello Serge
    Are yixie and zhexie plurals you can use with any noun irrespective of the measure word eg ge or jian that you would use with a number of objects?
    Would you consider doing a download of the Chinese-only situational dialogues for, say, every 10 lessons so we can download a “session” of Chinese to listen to?
    Your lessons are excellent!
    Thanks
    Pauline

  3. Serge Melnyk says:

    Nihao,

    Thanks for the question. Technically, yes, it should be ji3 tiao2, as tiao2 is a measure word for ties. But…since ge4 is the universal measure word, it can be used with any noun. Also, on the market, the language will most likely be simpler and you will hear less ‘educated’ or standard Mandarin. So hearing ni3 yao4 ji3ge won’t be a big surprise.

    Hope this helps.

    Serge

  4. Stephane Costeux says:

    Serge:
    I am studying lesson 11, dialog 3.
    B asks about ties: “Ni yao ji ge?”
    Why not: “Ni yao ji tiao?”

  5. Serge Melnyk says:

    Yes, they can be used with any noun. When talking about plurals, it doesn’t really matter which measure word, because we talk about several objects together, not single objects. Only if we name a single object, we need to use a measure word for that particular thing.

    E.g. Zhe4 jian4 shi4qing2-this matter, but zhe4xie1 shi4qing2-these matters.

    Thanks.

  6. Julian Robinson says:

    Hello Serge,

    Always wanted to learn chinese. Children have grown up so I decided to do some thing for myself, never too late to start I guess. Anyway I found your course, downloaded it all. I got the transcripts a couple of weeks later, they certainly make a big difference! I strongly recommend subscribing, great value.

    By a stroke of luck we have a Graduate from Shanghai on a work placement. He helps me during my lunch break, just to make sure I had got the right material (sorry! no disrespect meant by that) he looked through your transcripts and said they are very accurate. He told me to stay With your downloads as i have learnt more in three months than a colleague who is just starting his second year at college! Thank you very much.
    Julian.

  7. Fernando Destruge says:

    Hello Serge,

    It is a pleasure to study your classes, I realize I have made them part of my everyday life, I love it. Lucky me, I found you when you had few classes and I made a habit to repeat and talk loud as you suggested.

    But from time to time I listen to other programs that I listened before “no comparison” their way of teaching is sort of hard to follow. But your teaching makes me feel much comfortable and happy to understand it.

    One question, I got your song ‘Beijing welcome you” and I would like to have the words of that class. Could you please help me? I would love to play it with my guitar.
    Thank you for your nice work.
    fdestruge

  8. Serge Melnyk says:

    Ren2min2bi4(人民币) is the name for the Chinese currency. Literally, it translates as”people’s currency”-ren2min2 means ‘people’ and bi4 means ‘currency’. Just like you name a currency ‘dollar’ or ‘pound’. So nothing special, just a name.

    When you talk about money in Mandarin, you usually add kuai4 qian2(块钱) after the number. E.g. “ten chinese dollars(units, renminbi etc.) will be shi2 kuai4 qian2(十块钱), where shi2(十) means ‘ten’. Another way to say ‘ten renminbi’ is shi2 yuan2(十元), where yuan2(元) is yuen,a different name for asian currency unit (compare to yen in Japan and won in Korea which in fact are the same word but different pronunciation). Yuan has a broader meaning and includes all periods of Chinese history, while Renminbi or people’s currency only refers to communist China. Yuan is the same for Taiwan, Hongkong and China, renminbi is only in China. Hope this information is helpful.

  9. usualsuspect says:

    Hi Serge,

    I’ve tried other methods of learning Mandarin before find your site and I’m not sure if this is covered later on in the podcasts but if not can you please explain what ‘renminbi’ is, in terms of their currency. Until now I’ve been saying it as the unit instead of just ‘money’.

    Cheers

  10. John says:

    Wow! Serge! This site is awesome! Thank you so much for taking the time and energy to do this!!!

    I have been in China for almost 6 months now, teaching English in N.E. China and this site will definitely help me!

    Can you let all the universities in Canada know about this site?

    Have you ever talked to or met “Dashan” from Canada?

    Ok, all the best to you! Thanks again!

  11. filo says:

    ehi serge, i cannot get the works sheets dunno where to find them. listening every lesson, sometimes also three times…u r doin such an usefull and professional job!!! very compliments…i would likr to contact u for having a few hints about china!thanx mate helpin me a lot with my studies!

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